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Fort Valley Trail System

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Located at the base of the San Francisco Peaks, the Fort Valley Trail System was designed primarily for connecting popular mountain biking trails. This system is a multi-use trail to be used by bicycles, hikers, horses and motorcycles. Several sections of the trail were designed by a local biking organization to provide a more challenging ride for the more experienced mountain bike rider. The trail consists of loops that link with the Schultz Creek, Dry Lake Hill and Mt. Elden trail system.

Fort Valley trail is within the Chimney Springs area, just north of Flagstaff. The area has a gradual sloping terrain that consists of several shallow canyons and sweeping views of the San Francisco Peaks. Ponderosa Pine and Gambel Oak trees are the primary type of vegetation with New Mexico Locust and an occasional Hedgehog Cactus.

At a Glance

Usage: Medium
Best Season: Mid-March thru Mid-December
Restrictions: Campfires are NOT allowed in this area
ATV use is NOT allowed in this area
 
Closest Towns: Flagstaff, AZ
Operated By: Flagstaff Ranger District - 928-526-0866

General Information

Directions:

Location: Fort Valley Trail System is located 7 miles northwest of Flagstaff off highway 180. From Route 66 turn north on Humphrey’s St. then turn left at the third signal onto highway 180. Drive approximately 4.7 miles to Forest Road 164 B. Turn right, and drive about 400 feet then make another right on to a dirt road where the trailhead will be straight ahead about 100 feet.

Area/Length :  6.7 miles

Latitude : 35.249553

Longitude : -111.687102

Elevation : 7233' at trailhead

 

General Notes:

Difficulty: Moderate

Hiking Time Round Trip: 3 - 4 hours

Trail Etiquette: Please remember that you share the trail with other users and that trail courtesy and safety is your responsibility. Hikers and mountain bikers should yield the trail to equestrians, and mountain bikers should yield the trail to hikers.

Leave No Trace: Recognize your role in preserving wild lands by practicing these LNT principles: 1) Plan ahead and prepare, 2) Stay on designated trails, 3) Dispose of waste properly, 4) Leave what you find, 5) Minimize campfire impacts, 6) Respect wildlife, 7) Be considerate of other visitors.

 

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